CHOOSE THE RIGHT TYPE OF HEALTH CARE

Establishing a local primary care provider is an important part of managing your health care and is the first step for medical care and advice.  Calling your primary care clinic before seeking treatment elsewhere is recommended. 

              PRIMARY CARE CLINICS PROVIDE:

  • Treatment for chronic conditions like arthritis, diabetes, COPD and heart disease
  • Preventative care and vaccinations
  • Physicals and gynecology
  • Minor procedures
  • Treatment of minor injuries, including stitches
  • Treatment for illnesses like severe colds, the flu, sore throat and earache
  • Referrals for laboratory tests and imaging

 Lake Health Clinic – 541-947-3366

Warner Mountain Medical Clinic – 541-947-2331

           Lake Health Clinic – Walk-in Clinic

The walk-in clinic offers same-day service with a mid-level provider (physician’s assistant or family nurse practitioner) to diagnose and treat sudden illness and injuries including:

  • Joint strains or sprains
  • Treatment for illnesses like severe colds, the flu, sore throat, earache, fever, stomachache, bug bites and rashes
  • Pregnancy, rapid strep, flu and urinalysis testing
  • Referrals for laboratory tests and imaging

        The walk-in clinic sees patients on a first-come, first-served basis.   Open Monday – Friday, 7 a.m. – 5 p.m.  Based on provider availability, call 541-947-3366 for information.

        Warner Mountain Medical Clinic patients can also be seen at the walk-in clinic when a same-day appointment with a WMMC provider isn’t available.  Call WMMC at 541-947-2331 for same-day availability information.

           Lake District Hospital Emergency Care

The emergency care department is open 24-hours a day, 7 days a week and treats serious illness and injuries including:

  • Deep cuts or broken, displaced bones
  • Heart attack symptoms – chest pain, pain in jaw or arm, sudden weakness, dizziness or sweating
  • Stroke symptoms – sudden numbness, slurred speech, severe headache or weakness on one side of the body or face
  • Severe breathing problems
  • Sudden confusion or disorientation

Visits to emergency care can be expensive and should not be used to bypass regular primary care visits to your provider.

When to call 911

Ambulance crews assess and begin treatment at the scene and continue on their way to the ER.  911calls are for critical situations including:

  • Gunshot or other violence
  • Heart attack symptoms – chest pain, pain in jaw or arm, sudden weakness, dizziness or sweating
  • Stroke symptoms – sudden numbness, slurred speech, severe headache or weakness on one side of the body or face
  • Labored breathing or no breathing
  • Severe injury that should not be moved
  • Sudden collapse without getting better
  • Unconsciousness

Utilizing an ambulance service can also be expensive and should only be used in a critical emergency.  When you call, be prepared to give location, type of emergency, description of injuries or illness and description of patient.